BREAKING NEWS

BREAKING NEWS

Barmore, Cornell Share Thoughts On County Clerk Issues

Chautauqua County Clerk hopefuls Larry Barmore and Lori Cornell are making their plans known.

Both are members of the Chautauqua County Legislature, Cornell serving her second term and Barmore serving his third.

Cornell, a Democrat, says public service is her real passion and her extensive background in high-level governmental positions contributes to her administrative, organizational and management skills.

She says both her public and private sector experience qualifies her for the position and that she has a unique ability to solve public problems.

Barmore, a Republican, said he has spent the last year learning about the clerk’s office and duties in preparation to run for office and says his business management and customer service experience makes him the ideal candidate.

If elected, he has vowed to uphold Sandy Sopak’s 20 year reputation and “not let it fall by the wayside,” he said.

Of the position and dedication of the former clerk, Barmore says, “It’s important to me that we don’t throw all that work away and start all over again. We need to use that work and those concepts, to improve and enhance what’s already been done.”

PROMISES

Both candidates have made unique promises to Chautauqua County and its residents if elected.

Cornell is most focused on providing services at the lowest possible cost, she said. Through technology, innovation and a problem-solving approach, she says she will streamline the services of the clerk’s office and return more revenue to the county treasury.

Cornell announced on Oct. 25 that she would first create an advisory board to guide her in improving customer service and offer ideas on efficiency.

“The purpose of this panel is to strengthen the effort to improve service and lower costs. It will supplement the ideas and proposals I have discussed while campaigning for this office,” Cornell said in a press release.

Barmore wants to bring revenue to the DMV and clerk’s office, enhance services and improve customer service. He has rallied behind the “Renew Locally Campaign” which encourages motorists to visit local DMVs rather than using online services in order to keep money local.

“In the next three years there are absolutely no driver’s license renewals at all. We’re going to lose all of the revenue so it’s going to be extremely important that we get out and renew the campaign to get people to come to the county clerk’s office to make up that monetary difference,” Barmore said.

VETERANS

Cornell has vowed to personally visit every veterans organization in the county during her first year in office to provide all eligible veterans with access to “Return the Favor” cards, a program that provides a photo identification card certifying individuals as honorably discharged veteran who have filed their original discharge paperwork with the office. The card is then used at participating area businesses who have agreed to offer a discount or benefit to the veteran who presents the card.

“We owe to our veterans to not make them take a special trip to the office for the services they have earned,” Cornell said.

Barmore said, “I’ve visited tons of groups and there have been veterans in every crowd and I’ve told them of the Return the Favor cards.”

THE NEXT FOUR YEARS

If Cornell is elected, she plans to improve what she considers the top two issues facing Chautauqua County: jobs and taxes, she said.

“Lower taxes mean a better climate to grow and attract business,” she says. “I am a strong fiscal conservative and plan to continue my record in support of Chautauqua County’s best interests as county clerk.”

Barmore is focused on the DMV and the fact that New York has changed its renewal period from five years to eight years, he said.

He says he will encourage people to renew locally, and work to implement filing documents electronically.

Barmore said, “I will work with the staff and the state to make that process as smooth as possible for the users while we work towards the e-filing requirement that will eventually be a state mandate.”